SNIPPETS FROM HYGGE

  • Sweet Danish 'Hveder'

    Sweet Danish 'Hveder'

    Friday 17th is a bank holiday in Denmark, called ’Store Bededag’.  In 1686, it was decided that there was too many religious holidays across the year, so the decision to merge some into one holy day was made, thus making ‘Store Bededag’ (‘The great day for praying’)It’s an old tradition that the evening before the bank holiday, you eat warm sweet buns called ’Hveder’.The tradition is believed to be around 200 years old. Back then, no one, not even bakers, were allowed to work on ‘Store Bededag’ so it became a tradition for the bakers to make extra many buns...

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  • Image  - Aalborg Aquavit

    Make your own Easter Aquavit...

    Ah, Easter lunch. Now that’s a Danish tradition that you don’t want to miss – trust me, the food is excellent and, like Christmas, incorporates lots of our favourite smorrebrod as well as the traditional Danish Snaps or Aquavit.For the vast majority of Danes, Easter is a family holiday, and most people are off work. We cook at home, spend time with loved ones, eat, drink and have lots of hygge.And though Danish aquavit comes in many different sizes and flavours, there is something much more enjoyable and fun about making your own.And what would be more perfect for an...

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  • Danish Easter - The 'Gækkebrev'

    Danish Easter - The 'Gækkebrev'

    The Danish Easter tradition with foolish guessing letters - gækkebreve - is still kept all over Denmark during Easter, for children as well as adults. You send beautiful homemade foolish guessing letters, with no sender name, and test your friends and family members: can they guess your name from the poem in the letter? If not, you will get an Easter egg... Why? Where does the tradition come from?  The 'gækkebrev' tradition is originally a German tradition with so called 'knot letters'. They were send in Denmark from 1600 and to 1800. The tradition was that the receiver of the letter should...

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  • Time for Danish sweet buns...

    Time for Danish sweet buns...

    Fastelavn is a Danish holiday normally celebrated on Sunday or Monday before Ash Wednesday. It is somewhat similar to the American Halloween where children dress in costumes and go from house to house calling for candy or they will play tricks (though tricks are normally played no matter what, such as toothpaste or shaving cream on door handles or toilet paper on cars).Some towns may have a parade followed by the traditional ‘slå katten af tynden’ which is a wooden barrel that has cats painted on it and is filled with candy. The children takes turn hitting the barrel with...

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  • Dark Danish Rye Bread

    Dark Danish Rye Bread

    A solid dark Rye Bread is the foundation for any Danish open sandwich, as well as perfect for many other lunch and breakfast dishes. It’s also a super healthy alternative to the traditional white wheat bread that a lot of people eat. It keeps you full for much longer and is full of healthy fibers and nutrients…There is not really any reason not to swap the dull, white bread with the dark and seedy Danish rye.There are many different variations to a Rye Bread recipe, and traditionally it is made on sourdough, giving it a natural rise from the bacteria...

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  • Danish Risalamande

    Danish Risalamande

    Risalamande is properly the most famous and traditional Danish Christmas dessert that you can make. It is a rice pudding with fresh vanilla, almonds and whipped cream, and is typically served with warm cherry sauce.The word Risalamande comes from the French word Riz à l’amande, which directly translated means ‘rice with almonds’. Risalamande is (more or less) only served as the Christmas dessert right after the dinner on Christmas eve. In Denmark, and most of the Nordic and some European countries, we celebrate Christmas at Christmas eve and not at Christmas day like in the UK and US.In Denmark there...

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